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Some Useful Information On Herbs:

Any plant that is grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value is called an herb. It is common practice that, from an herb plant only the green and leafy parts are used. The culinary usages are obviously different from the medicinal uses, in fact, it is often the case that the properties of culinary and medicinal herbs are entirely different to be found in the same plant. For example, medicinal herbs usually tend to be shrubs or woody plants. Culinary herbs, on the other hand, are typically more leafy and soft.  Interestingly, the seeds, berries, bark, root, or other parts of a herbal plant make great spices. These plants also bear edible fruits or vegetables.

Culinary herbs are different from other vegetables in the sense that they are not the primary objects to be cooked or consumed. Instead, they are used to provide flavor when used as spices.  

Botanical definitions

Botanical science defines a herb as a plant that does not produce a woody stem. It usually dies in temperate climates. Death can be complete in case of annual herbs or the herb can simply go back to its roots in case of perennial herbs. Examples of herbs include: bulbs, peonies, hosta, grasses, and banana.  The botanical term herbaceous means a plant having the characteristic of a herb or being leaf-like in color and texture.

Herbalism

Herbalism is also known as phytotherapy. It is a very old folk medicine that is based on the use of plants and plant extracts.  Human beings have been looking for healing powers in the vegetable kingdom for a long time. There are innumerable types of indigenous plants that have been used by people for centuries in the treatment of many ailments. The history of such usage is long and well documented. Evidence has been found that sixty thousand years ago the Neanderthals living in present day Iraq used plants as medicines.  Radiocarbon dating of the Lascaux caves in France has revealed that cave paintings dated between 13000-25000 BCE displays the use of plants as healing agents.  It must be appreciated that our forefathers spent several centuries slowly building upon the knowledge of their own predecessors to arrive at proper medical conclusions. It took many generations of trial and error to expand this knowledge base. The individuals who took upon themselves the task of following this line of reasoning and medical discovery are whom we today remember as “healers” or “Shaman”.  Any plant that is grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value is called an herb. It is common practice that, from an herb plant only the green and leafy parts are used. The culinary usages are obviously different from the medicinal uses, in fact, it is often the case that the properties of culinary and medicinal herbs are entirely different to be found in the same plant. For example, medicinal herbs usually tend to be shrubs or woody plants. Culinary herbs, on the other hand, are typically more leafy and soft.  Interestingly, the seeds, berries, bark, root, or other parts of a herbal plant make great spices. These plants also bear edible fruits or vegetables.  Culinary herbs are different from other vegetables in the sense that they are not the primary objects to be cooked or consumed. Instead, they are used to provide flavor when used as spices.

Botanical definitions

Botanical science defines a herb as a plant that does not produce a woody stem. It usually dies in temperate climates. Death can be complete in case of annual herbs or the herb can simply go back to its roots in case of perennial herbs.  Examples of herbs include: bulbs, peonies, hosta, grasses, and banana.  The botanical term herbaceous means a plant having the characteristic of a herb or being leaf-like in color and texture.

 

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